Blog posts tagged with 'gluten'

by Karen A. Masterson-Koch

Delicious and enjoyable foods are gluten free. In fact, most traditional foods, other than pasta dishes, do not contain it. The main problem is high consumption — eating less gluten and offending foods would be much better.

Eating natural foods are foundational to the body, besides being one of life’s pleasures. Unfortunately, gluten-packed grain snacks, cereals including oats, and fast foods are being consumed in copious amounts. Despite the insatiable desire for these carbohydrates, science is now proving that the excess of gluten in these foods can be a major roadblock to good health. Health conscious people are finding that just by lowering the breads, cereals and pastas (especially from whole grains) or stopping them entirely, allows them to start feeling better in just a matter of days and weeks.

Eat a variety of natural foods

Reduce or avoid gluten and other allergens

Choose a quality Aloe Vera and probiotics

Other food allergies and additives may also be problematic, explaining why disease is on the rise in almost every category. Two supplements can be helpful along this new natural path. The first step is a quality whole leaf Aloe Vera juice concentrate or tablet to support improved digestion, allergies and skin renewal of the gut and body. The second step would be adding a probiotics (friendly bacteria) partner, especially after a round of antibiotics and/or failing health. Both work as a team for improving digestion and are not contra-indicating to pharmaceutical drug use so commonly seen today.

Gluten & Anti-nutrients Affect All Body Function

Gluten, along with other food allergies, referred to as anti-nutrients, must be considered factors in all ailments from A – Z. The most detrimental triggers include whole grains, dairy and cane sugar. Consuming a large amount may even delay normal growth and development of the body, effecting both mental and physical wellbeing for infants, kids and adults including:

Healthy skin, hair, nails and gums

Energy, weight and athletic performance

Auto-immunity and immunity factor

CVD, strokes and respiratory system

Mental, brain and nervous system

The addiction to bread, pasta and other grain-based foodstuff, along with ice cream, soft cheeses, cow’s milk, many yogurt products, sodas, pizza and more have kept people from experimenting with their diets. Wouldn’t you love to hit your best weight goal, reverse disease and even achieve athletic goals you have only dreamed of? It’s never too late! Going without gluten and making better food choices is doable for the whole family.

In fact, many of the top athletes of today are finding that their best performance has come after giving up gluten. Both world tennis player, Novak Djokovic, who carries multiple world titles and 2009 Super Bowl MVP, Drew Breeze, of the Saints, put gluten on the back burner and reaped the benefits. Top track and field athlete and 2013 World Figure WBFF first place winner, Monica Brant, says, “Eating a low gluten diet and consuming a whole leaf Aloe Vera juice concentrate were two of the best decisions I have made to keep my competitive edge, even at age 46.”

What is Gluten?

Gluten is primarily found in grains and its flour products including wheat, rye, barley, oats and even brown rice. The clincher is its highest content is in the fiber. Boy, did we get it wrong! My suggestion is to aim for increasing food fibers easier to digest from fruits and vegetables like apples, carrots, celery, yams, red potatoes, and raw nuts, seeds and legumes as tolerated and leave the grains alone for now.

More devious in recent years, gluten flour is also being added to foods as a thickening agent to maintain firmness of breadstuff and many times not included on the ingredients. Even trendy foods like granolas, Ezekiel and sourdough breads, plus some tortillas have been fortified, lending a slight rubbery texture, yet also triggering more body symptoms of gluten intolerance.

The name “gluten” actually tells you its property is glue like. And, its chemistry is a protein carbohydrate molecule that is very sticky and challenging for many — if not all people to digest. Not digesting gluten and other complex carbohydrates well brings about unhealthy inflammation in the gut and the entire body.

This sometimes silent, poor digestion damages the ability to absorb valuable building nutrients from our foods and supplements. This can lead to malnutrition and lots of disease opportunity. Even neurological disorders effecting balance and brain function are accentuated, plus all body pathways decline. A fellow with Parkinson’s disease remarked that every time he ate his favorite sandwich made on whole grain bread, his limbs would shake so badly he had to lay down! Classic gluten symptoms include digestive and joint pain, bloating, gas, constipation and/or diarrhea, fatigue, bruising, skin blisters, manic-depression and failing health.

Food Trends & Marketing Are Confusing!

Food trends like pizza and fast foods have all but replaced homemade dinner at an alarming rate. Yogurt sales have exploded and ironically, organic sugar is being given a healthy pass; yet these two both need to come with a warning — may increase bowel inflammation, very problematic in large amounts!

People think they are eating healthy, yet even foods marked Gluten Free still contain many challenging ingredients that bring about more gut grief for sensitives than eating just plain white flour, crackers and white rice at times. Some low gluten flours are tolerated better like millet, quinoa, bean and almond flours, plus the rare sprouted variety.

Diet fads like Raw Foods and the Paleo-Caveman diets have evolved out of the necessity to avoid the anti-nutrients and temporarily serve a good purpose. Yet research supports that long-term, the Mediterranean Diet, with a variety of quality proteins including fish and lean meats, along with an abundance of lightly steamed or raw vegetables, best supports body wellness.

Why Aloe Vera & Probiotics?

The ancients used Aloe Vera as a First Aid plant for digestion, constipation and illness on the inside. Topically, the yellow sap soothed pain, burns, swelling and wounds from head to toe. The whole leaf Aloe Vera is classed as an herbal bitter — that is if it still contains the dark yellow sap found just under the outer leaf of mature plants.

Look for the concentrated Activ-Aloe products that are not diluted and work fast. It turns on all digestive juices to flow properly including the important hydrochloric acid (HCL), giving support for heartburn, IBS, reflux, ulcers and more. Studies show absorption of important food nutrients are increased by almost 300%. A quality probiotic is also important for combating bad bacteria in the lower gut, reducing gas and supporting immunity. Together with healthier foods, Aloe Vera and probiotics make the best supplement picks of today for a healthier world — Enjoy!

[article reposted with permission from developinghealthyhabits.com]

by Natasha Trenev

Celiac Disease (CD), also referred to as gluten intolerance, can mean a lifetime of avoiding grains containing gluten, wheat, rye and barely. Exposure to even the smallest amount of gluten can trigger a damaging and sometimes painful gastrointestinal reaction in people who are sensitive to the stuff. Avoiding gluten altogether can be very difficult, and the quest to avoid it can disrupt the lives of those suffering from the sensitivity, as well as the lives of family members. Due to the constraints of a gluten-free diet, alternative therapies for CD are being explored.

About Celiac Disease

Celiac Disease affects approximately one in 133 Americans, or around 2.18 million Americans. Symptoms can range from classic gastrointestinal disturbances like diarrhea, reflux, abdominal pain and bloating, to more complex symptoms such as malnutrition, weight loss, fatigue, easy bruising, skin rashes, anemia and other isolated nutrient deficiencies.

The gastrointestinal tract breaks down food into smaller components the body can absorb and use for various purposes. People with CD cannot break down gluten into proteins small enough for their bodies to digest. With repeated exposure to larger, unaltered proteins, the body may develop an immune response to gluten.

The Connection between Microbes in the Gut and Gluten Sensitivity

Some of the newest research shows an association between gluten sensitivities and the bacteria living in the intestinal tract known as the gut microbiota. Bacteria living in the small intestine participate in the metabolism of gluten. Scientists know that people with gluten sensitivities tend to have a different set of bacteria living in their intestines compared with those without the dietary problem.

Scientists wanted to know, though, if the bacterial communities from a person with gluten sensitivities would handle wheat proteins differently than the bacterial communities of a person without the condition. To find out, researchers from McMaster University in Canada isolated gluten-degrading bacteria from the small intestines of participants with and without gluten sensitivities. The scientists then transferred the bacteria from both groups into germ-free lab mice, which had no intestinal bacteria at all, and then created colonies of the mice. Next, the scientists fed gluten to the mice and observed the results.

Microbes in the small intestine trigger immune reactions when they encounter gluten. The scientists determined that the microbes from a person with gluten sensitivities trigger different immune reactions than do the microbes from someone without the sensitivity. Specifically, the bacteria from those with gluten sensitivities reacted by producing peptides which talk differently to immune cells and provoke a stronger immune response.

The researchers then tested how various peptides isolated from people with gluten sensitivities reacted with blood immune cells. They found that certain peptides from gluten-sensitive individuals activated gluten-specific immune cells. The scientists also found that different bacteria isolated from healthy people were able to degrade the peptides in a way that decreases gluten-related immune reactions.

New Research Indicates Specific Probiotic Bacteria May Help

In another study published in the Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology, supplementation with the probiotic bacteria Bifidobacterium infantis NLS super strain was shown to alleviate some gastrointestinal symptoms associated with celiac disease in newly-diagnosed participants who were still consuming a gluten containing diet. In that study, researchers randomly assigned participants to either the test group receiving B. infantis probiotic capsules, or the control group receiving a placebo capsule. Participants took two capsules three times each day, 15 minutes before meals, for three weeks. The researchers gathered data on the participants on the first day of the study, on day 10, and again 21 days later at the end of the study. Data included vital signs, safety reports, urine and blood tests, and questionnaires.

The researchers found that some gastrointestinal symptoms improved for participants who took B. infantis probiotic, specifically indigestion, constipation and gastroesophageal reflux. Furthermore, the scientists noted administration of the B. infantis probiotic was not associated with serious adverse effects or significant biochemical changes. The researchers also noted that these changes took place despite the fact the participants were still consuming gluten. In the future, they hope to repeat this study to see what changes occur in a similar group already on a gluten-free diet.

The research underscores the link between gut bacteria and the immune system during gluten metabolism. The results of the study highlight the roles bacteria play in modulating the body’s reaction to gluten. The findings are also consistent with the theory that imbalances in bacteria could contribute to the symptoms of gluten sensitivities, even though the bacteria included in the study may not be the only ones capable of modifying gluten digestion.

Infants, B. infantis and Celiac Disease Development

In addition to the role that Bifidobacterium infantis has been shown to have in people with active CD, it’s also been well studied for its importance in the infant gut. Breast milk has been shown to stimulate the growth of B. infantis in the guts of healthy newborns. Researchers at the University of California, Davis, have even gone so far as to name it the “Champion Colonizer of the Infant Gut.” In one study of 164 healthy infants who have at least one first-degree relative with celiac disease, they found reduced numbers of Bifidobacterium in infants who later had an increased risk for developing celiac disease. This indicates that the type of milk fed, the gut bacteria that develop early on, and genetic predisposition may all play a role in the development of Celiac Disease later in life.

Research continues to show a connection between microbes living in the gut and celiac disease. These studies are early indicators of the use of specific strains of probiotics as supportive supplements for people who suffer from celiac disease and ongoing research may someday help provide non-dietary treatments for people who suffer from celiac disease.

[article reposted with permission from developinghealthyhabits.com]